A really Good Day

There are good days and bad days.  In spite of the weather and my inadequate heating, today was a good day.  In the morning, I attended  a discussion at the college about water and in the evening took part in a webinar on renewable energy.

The mail brought the good news that my green card will be renewed and that I will get a State refund (as soon as I sign the return!!); a lower than expected water bill, a new debit card and a letter from a lawyer in the UK offering me some money left to my late husband by his ancient maiden aunt.

But the most exciting part of the day was an invitation to join a group looking to update the Constitution.  This is one of several missions I have, and I actually can’t believe that I haven’t yet posted anything to that effect.  So here goes:

A CONSTITUTION FOR THE 21st CENTURY.

The US Constitution has to change.

Based on this Constitution the country has a dysfunctional Congress, a looming theocracy/plutocracy, huge wealth disparity, and an environmental disaster in the making. And that is just a short list. This is not a great country  any more; it is not even a nice country; it is not one I choose to belong to.   I have lived here for 30 years, so it is home. But a home that needs a serious upgrade, one that can, I believe, only be achieved by changing the Constitution.

The US Constitution was written by very well-intentioned men as a way to launch a new country. They produced a remarkable document and launched a remarkable nation. In the 18th century. But we are now in the 21st century. Times have changed in ways that the Founding Fathers could not have imagined in their wildest dreams. At least one of them – that great intellect and visionary Thomas Jefferson – acknowledged that developments in the future would necessitate changes to the Constitution. Jefferson suggested, with little support, that the Constitution should be revised every generation (at that time considered to be eighteen years). That means we should have had some 13 REVISIONS by now, not just the 27 amendments that have been ratified.

It might be helpful to look at the country as a not-for-profit organization with a board of directors (Congress) governed by a set of bye-laws (the Constitution). Members of the Board serve a fixed term, usually without remuneration, for the good of the organization. Bye-laws are revised as and when circumstances change. New bye-laws need to be approved by a quorum of the membership.

There are many thinking people who acknowledge that this country has problems which cannot be resolved with the Constitution as it stands. However, few are willing to take on the challenge of changing it. The biggest stumbling block is determining who is qualified to draw up a new document.

I believe that there is a remarkably qualified group of men (and a few women) who could do the job. They have been acclaimed as leaders in their field by impartial, non-political, external sources. They are, ipso facto, highly intelligent. Their expertise covers the full range of human endeavour.

They are the living Nobel Prize recipients.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s